24 February 2012

The Best in Aid Blogging 2011

There is no use in writing a post for each of these categories when they confirm the overall award for Best Aid Blog at the ABBAs 2011. Because of that, ABBA will not do for the man who is 'simply the best.' As the results show, Chris Blattman has set himself ahead of the pack. His posts are a mix of academic musings, mommy blogging (as Wronging Rights would say), analysis, and quick hitters from recent studies. As an overall resource, Chris is one of the best. It is why he won as blogger and for twitter.

If the US government is looking for advice on how to win hearts and minds, an obvious adviser is everyone's favorite aid blogger from the north.

Best Aid Blog

Chris Blattman - http://chrisblattman.com/
37.1%199
Tales From the Hood - http://talesfromethehood.com/
9.3%50
From Poverty to Power - http://www.oxfamblogs.org/fp2p/
26.5%142
Why Dev - http://whydev.org
10.3%55
Blood and Milk - http://bloodandmilk.org/
3.9%21
World Bank Development Impact Blog - http://blogs.worldbank.org/impactevaluations/
12.9%69

Best Academic Blog

African Arguments - http://africanarguments.org/blog/
9.5%
Chris Blattman - http://chrisblattman.com
59.1%
Marc F. Bellemare - http://marcbellemare.com
14.2%
Ed Carr - http://www.edwardrcarr.com/opentheechochamber/
10.2%
Lawrence Haddad - http://www.developmenthorizons.com/
7.0%
Best Blog Design
Good Intents - http://goodintents.org/
12.3%
Global Dashboard - globaldashboard.org
15.0%
Chris Blattman - http://chrisblattman.com
39.2%
Owen Barder - http://owen.org
14.0%
More Altitude - http://morealtitude.wordpress.com/
9.6%
Shotgun Shack - http://shotgunshackblog.com/
10.0%
All the finalists should not be glossed over on account of Mr. Blattman's sweep. There excellent blogs in the mix and even the ones that were nominated for best design were recognized because of having a regular audience.

As I have noted before, the contest continued to tilt towards men. I really have little idea as to why. Possibly it has something to do with it being a largely academic field and maybe there are more men in the social sciences that deal with poverty alleviation (I have absolutely no data on hand for this and could be entirely wrong). There could be a gender bias. I am not sure.

Sing it Tina!

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